Welcome!

This blog is a collection of thoughts about science. Its title refers to a technique for separating out different colored dyes in an ink mixture. Just as chromatography illuminates the individual parts of a mixture, I’ll be picking parcels of science and expanding upon those bands of knowledge. The result will hopefully be a blend as rich and colorful as that created by ink chromatography.
  • naloxone image 2

    An Inflated Sense of Optimism for Anti-Overdose Drug?

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  • figs

    Every Fig You Eat Contains a Digested Wasp

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  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    On Modern Dying, and How We Might Save It

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  • How to Hurtle Through Rock at High Speeds

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  • ebola

    Ebola, in 140 Characters

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  • teen kissing

    Teen Medicine

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  • cardiovascular system

    A Little Oxidation in Your Cholesterol Might Be a Good Thing

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  • double helix

    The Double Helix: James Watson Was as Savvy as George Lucas

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  • photo 3

    In Progress: Animating Aquidneck

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  • is MSG bad for you?

    MSG, Gluten and This Thing Called FODMAPs

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  • "This movement is not a group of people carrying plants. For that day you are going to be that pine tree. We are the forest."

    AUDIO—We Are the Forest: Bringing Plants to Life in Lima, Peru

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  • I decided to use thread, beads, and little pieces of rubbish to illustrate stormwater runoff through the city.

    Lessons in Water Cycling (and Animating!): Green Infrastructure in Providence, RI

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  • green crab thangs

    VIDEO: Green Crab Thangs

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  • SICB

    #SICB2014: Scientists, Let’s Talk About Narrative

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  • Sentimental in appearance, this scene is nothing more than a baby reaching out for a reflexive squeeze.

    VESTIGIA

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  • IMG_2648

    So THAT’s what all the origami was about…

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  • IMG_2930

    How Did the Seahorse Get its Shape?

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  • pheromone party

    Fragrant Fraternizing: What Do Our Pheromones Tell Us?

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  • Image from "Nix Your Tics" by B. Duncan McKinlay

    Mys / tic / al

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  • How Super is Super Enough?

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  • mars

    Piecing together a Martian atmosphere

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  • einstein darwin

    Scientists, Channel Your Inner Darwins and Einsteins

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  • orionid

    Finding Cosmic Insignificance in the Orionids

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  • casey dunn

    Look at this amazing organism

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  • tdh temp

    Unearthing deep climates: the journey of a climate historian

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  • amnh

    Finding Home Among the Wildebeests

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  • art of science

    Finding a palate for the science palette

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  • Argonne researchers Osman Eryilmaz (left) and Gerald Jeka (right) recover industrial parts from the large-scale ultra-fast boriding furnace after a successful boriding treatment. The furnace uses an electrochemical process similar to that of batteries to deposit boron on metal workpieces. (Photo credit: Osman Eryilmaz)

    New boriding technique coats metal workpieces in minutes

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  • In this split screen image, Argonne engineer Henning Lohse-Busch evaluates an electric vehicle under extreme hot (left) and cold conditions (right). The Advanced Powertrain Research Facility’s Environmental Test Cell is equipped to evaluate vehicles and their components at a temperature range of 20°F to 95°F.

    Turning up the heat: Argonne’s thermal cell facility puts vehicles to the test

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  • Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility’s process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook.

    The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of battery materials

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  • There are several types of solar technology; this is a typical solar field for a type called dish engine. (Photo by Randy Montoya, courtesy Sandia National Laboratory)

    Argonne supports solar energy planning in Southwest

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  • fulla

    U.S. Department of Energy student internships foster scientific and self-discovery

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  • Greetings from Lemont, IL!

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  • early career

    Off to a good start: Argonne’s rising stars in battery research shine

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  • Recently honored with a federal award for energy and water savings, Argonne is lowering its campus energy footprint in creative ways. These hybrid solar- and wind-powered streetlights, which are completely off the power grid, adorn Argonne sidewalks. A small solar panel and wind turbine powers the LED light atop the fixture. The light can store energy in batteries for up to three days without sun or wind.

    New Energy Efficient Lights Save Tax Dollars

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  • electric cars

    The long, winding road to advanced batteries for electric cars

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  • chinatown msg

    The MSG Files, Part V: Public Relations

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  • chinese restaurant syndrome

    The MSG Files, Part IV: Chinese Restaurant Syndrome

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  • cover photo

    The MSG Files, Part III: Umami

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  • scallop asparagus tomato

    The MSG Files, Part II: Natural Sources of Glutamate in Our Bodies and Food

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  • miso soup

    The MSG Files, Part I: What is Monosodium Glutamate?

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    Tragedy of the Commons, or the Rise of Globalization and Fall of Local Management Practices

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  • deep blue

    Redfield Ratios: Unchanging? Or Subject to Anthropogenic Drivers?

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  • Our experiment to test the effects of climate change on the health of salt marsh cordgrasses

    Musings from Sapelo, and Some Good News

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  • beneath the waves

    “Trophic Cascade of the Purple Marsh Crab” Has Been Selected for the 2012 Beneath the Waves Film Festival!

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